WeHaKee Camp for Girls – Rich in History and Legend

The current location of WeHaKee Camp for Girls was originally a logging camp. As a result, it is home to a large concentration of beautifully tall, virgin white pine.

Beginning in the early 1920’s, legendary Notre Dame football coach, Knute Rockne operated a football camp here for a number of decades. It later became a Jewish girl’s camp named Camp Chicagami.

In the late 1950’s, the St. Louis Hawks (now the NBA Atlanta Hawks) ran a basketball camp at this location. And in 1963, then WeHaKee Director, Sister Marie Karen Hawkinson moved the camp from its location in Marinette, Wisconsin (on the waters of Green Bay) to this current site on the shores of Hunter Lake at the base of the pristine Chequamagon National Forest.

WeHaKee Camp for Girls continues today at its site near Winter, Wisconsin. Girls and young women from around the country and the world attend camp each summer where they begin lifelong friendships, develop new skills, increase their confidence and self-esteem, grow in their faith, and have great fun!

The History of WeHaKee Camp for Girls

  • 1923

    With the help of two nieces and their friends, Sister David O’Leary opens WeHaKee Camp for Girls on the shores of Green Bay in Marinette, Wisconsin, and welcomes its first group of campers. Sister David O’Leary was the Camp Director.

  • 1933

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls celebrates its 10th Anniversary.

  • 1943

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls celebrates its 20th Anniversary.

  • 1953

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls celebrates its 30th Anniversary.

  • 1957

    Sister Noel Boggs becomes the second director of WeHaKee Camp for Girls.

  • 1963

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls celebrates its 40th Anniversary. Since the camp was outgrowing its Lake Michigan location, this was the last year that WeHaKee Camp for Girls was located in Marinette, Wisconsin on Green Bay.

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls moved to its current site on Hunter Lake, near Winter in northwestern Wisconsin.  Sister Marie Karen Hawkinson affectionately known as “Hawkie” or “SMK” became the director as the camp began on Hunter Lake.

  • 1964

    The first year WeHaKee Camp for Girls was at its current location on the shores of Hunter Lake, in Winter, Wisconsin.

    Did You Know? Our current site has a rich camping history! In the 1800’s, it was a logging camp for those crews harvesting the great white pines. In the 1920’s it became famed Notre Dame football coach, Knute Rockne’s Football Camp for Boys. And in 1939, Ruth and Rabbi Ferdinand Isserman founded Camp Chickagami, a Jewish camp for girls.

  • 1967

    The new chapel was built replacing the Rockne two-story double cabin.

  • 1968

    The horse stables were built.

  • 1973

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls celebrates its 50th Anniversary.

  • 1983

    WeHaKee Camp for Girls celebrates its 60th Anniversary.

  • 1984

    Sister Arturo Cranston becomes the fourth director of WeHaKee Camp for Girls.

  • 1986

    The Health Center or “Band Aid” was built using trees from camp.

  • 1988-2003

  • 1991

  • 1993

  • 1994

  • 1995

  • 1998

  • 1999

  • 2003

  • 2004

  • 2009

  • 2013

Did You Know?

WeHaKee Camp for Girls is named after Mary WeHaKee La Batte, a young girl raised by the Dominicans of Sinsinawa in Sinsinawa, Wisconsin.

Mary’s mother was a Sioux Indian and her father was of French descent. After her father was killed, her mother confided her child to Sister Alberta Duffy, who brought her to the Sinsinawa Mound.

If you have stories, pictures, or anything else to share about your experiences at WeHaKee Camp for Girls, we’d love to hear from you. Perhaps we can even include what you share here on our website.

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Thank You!

WeHaKee Camp for Girls is a sponsored institution of the Dominicans of Sinsinawa and has always been open and welcoming to girls of all faiths and backgrounds since its inception in 1923.

The dedication of the Sisters of the Dominicans of Sinsinawa, who maintain a strong and endeared presence at WeHaKee Camp for Girls, is interwoven throughout camp.

Their life’s work has been, and continues to be the care, nurturing, and advancement of girls and young women, helping them grow to become strong, confident, independent, and caring leaders.